Articles
Testimonials
Certificates
Search
Privacy Policy
Disclaimer
Contact Us

Click to verify BBB accreditation and to see a BBB report.

The McConnaughy Difference:

26 years of tax resolution know-how

Insider's knowledge of IRS tactics

Master's Degree in Taxation

Knowledge constantly updated

Three guarantees that you'll be satisfied

Three important intangibles

Honest, responsible, skilled tax resolution services at a cost anyone can afford.


ACTUAL AGREEMENTS

Department of Treasure
Internal Revenue Service

Release of Levy

(David & Nancy)

<-----I can do this for you too!

Under the provisions of Internal Revenue Code section 6343, all wages, salary and other income now owed to or becoming payable to the taxpayer(s) names above are released from the levy.

Offer in Compromise

(James)

<---------Put your name right here!

We have accepted your offer in compromise signed and dated by you on (DATE). The date of acceptance is the date of this letter.

Pay When Able

(Martin)

<------------If you're retired on SS,
you probably won't ever pay!

We have noted your account that you're currently unable to pay your total balance or to make installment payments. You may make payments as you are able.

Installment Agreement

(Ian)

<----------------Well within his budget!

We've accepted your offer for an Installment Agreement. The agreement covers the tax period(s) shown above. Please make your first payment of $50.00.

Innocent Spouse

(Martin)

<---------------Innocent spouse, over
$25,000 taxes forgiven!

You are also entitled to equitable relief of liability under Section 6015(f) of the Internal Revenue Code of the tax that was not paid with the filed tax return(s).

Decreased Lien

(Robert)

<--------Saved him over $200,000!

...updated the amount of the Notice of Federal Tax Lien, from $215,881.92 to the decreased amount...of $11,491.93.
Tax Relief Services


Quick! What is your most valuable business asset?

If you are like most business people, your mind might quickly fly over your balance sheet. Is it your equipment? Is it your location? Is it your accounts receivable?

For most businesses, the most valuable business asset isn't on the balance sheet.

It's their customer list. And those businesses for whom this isn't the most valuable business asset should change their orientation to make it so.

The hardest, most expensive sale we ever make to a customer is the first one.

In that first, critical, transaction we earn or lose the trust of the customer. Once we have the trust of the customer, we open the door to many more sales and to referrals, which most of us agree are the very best new customers to get.

Many businesses frantically work at bringing in new businesses while they neglect developing the "acre of diamonds" at their doorstep represented by their customer list.

Why would you want to know the lifetime value of a customer?

The lifetime value of a customer is a measure of the value of the customer to your business. It is the potential contribution of the customer to your business over a period of time. When you know the lifetime value of a customer, you have a benchmark for how much you would or should be willing to invest to acquire a customer.

When you evaluate the effectiveness of your marketing, instead of focusing on the response ratio (how many responded compared to messages delivered), you should focus on the return received (number of customers times lifetime value) for the investment made (campaign cost). Suddenly you find you can justify a much greater promotion investment when you look at your returns in this way, and this provides the engine for significant business growth.

Chances are your competitors are too cheap to make the necessary investment, and this can give you a competitive advantage.

How can you quantify the "lifetime value of a customer"?

Estimate the profit for the transactions you expect to have with the customer over the period you expect to do business with him or her. If this is an unknown long term, use five years. You should collect statistics of the transactions done with customers and how long you keep customers. Also, factor in the benefit for referrals from your customers.

Here's an example:

At a computer software store, customers make average purchases each year of $500. The average gross profit is 30%. Most customers do business with the store for five years. One out of three customers refer a new customer.

Average purchases $ 500

Years X 5

Total purchases $2,500

Gross profit % X .30

Total gross profit $750

Add 1/3 gross profit for referrals $250

Total lifetime value $1,000

If this business invested $1,000 to get a new customer, it would "break even."

Obviously the business wants to make a profit, but now it has a benchmark to work on based on its own situation. Also, advertising and promotion now represent an investment on which a return can be measured, instead of just an expense "thrown against the wall."

Try applying this lifetime value approach in your business as a growth strategy.



Ask a Question: Personalized Professional Advice

Questions/Comments:
Name:
Email:
Phone:
Login   Search   Site Map   Privacy Policy   Disclaimer    Powered by CPA Website Solutions