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ACTUAL AGREEMENTS

Department of Treasure
Internal Revenue Service

Release of Levy

(David & Nancy)

<-----I can do this for you too!

Under the provisions of Internal Revenue Code section 6343, all wages, salary and other income now owed to or becoming payable to the taxpayer(s) names above are released from the levy.

Offer in Compromise

(James)

<---------Put your name right here!

We have accepted your offer in compromise signed and dated by you on (DATE). The date of acceptance is the date of this letter.

Pay When Able

(Martin)

<------------If you're retired on SS,
you probably won't ever pay!

We have noted your account that you're currently unable to pay your total balance or to make installment payments. You may make payments as you are able.

Installment Agreement

(Ian)

<----------------Well within his budget!

We've accepted your offer for an Installment Agreement. The agreement covers the tax period(s) shown above. Please make your first payment of $50.00.

Innocent Spouse

(Martin)

<---------------Innocent spouse, over
$25,000 taxes forgiven!

You are also entitled to equitable relief of liability under Section 6015(f) of the Internal Revenue Code of the tax that was not paid with the filed tax return(s).

Decreased Lien

(Robert)

<--------Saved him over $200,000!

...updated the amount of the Notice of Federal Tax Lien, from $215,881.92 to the decreased amount...of $11,491.93.
Tax Relief Services


In this Financial Guide, we discuss the types of moving expenses you can deduct.

If you meet the requirements of the tax law for the deduction of moving expenses, you can deduct the following types of moving expenses, as long as they are "reasonable":

  1. Moving your household goods and personal effects (including in-transit or foreign-move storage expenses), and
  2. Traveling (including lodging but not meals) to your new home.

Note: The rules applicable to moving within or to the United States are different from the rules that apply to moves outside the United States. These rules are discussed separately.

What Are "Reasonable" Expenses?

You can deduct only those expenses that are reasonable under the circumstances of your move. For example, the cost of traveling from your former home to your new one should be by the shortest, most direct route available by conventional transportation. If during your trip to your new home, you make side trips for sight-seeing, the additional expenses for your side trips are not deductible as moving expenses.

Travel by Car - How To Calculate the Deduction

If you use your car to take yourself, members of your household, or your personal effects to your new home, you can figure your expenses by deducting either:

  1. Your actual expenses, such as gas and oil for your car, if you keep an accurate record of each expense, or
  2. 24 cents a mile in 2009 (19 cents in Jan - June 30, 2008 and 27 cents from July to December 2008).

Tip: You can deduct parking fees and tolls you pay in moving. You cannot deduct any general repairs, general maintenance, insurance, or depreciation for your car.

Member of Your Household

You can deduct moving expenses you pay for yourself and members of your household. A member of your household is anyone who has both your former and new home as his or her home. It does not include a tenant or employee, unless you can claim that person as a dependent.

Moves Within or to the United States

If you meet the requirements of the tax law for the deduction of moving expenses, you can deduct allowable expenses for a move to the area of a new main job location within the United States or its possessions. Your move may be from one United States location to another or from a foreign country to the United States.

Household goods and personal effects. You can deduct the cost of packing, crating, and transporting your household goods and personal effects and those of the members of your household from your former home to your new home. If you use your own car to move your things, compute the deduction under the rule discussed above under "Travel By Car."

Tip: You can include the cost of storing and insuring household goods and personal effects within any period of 30 consecutive days after the day your things are moved from your former home and before they are delivered to your new home.

You can deduct any costs of connecting or disconnecting utilities do the moving your household goods, appliances, or personal effects.

Tip: You can deduct the cost of shipping your car and your pets to your new home.

You can deduct the cost of moving your household goods and personal effects from a place other than your former home. Your deduction is limited to the amount it would have cost to move them from your former home.

Example: Paul Brown is a resident of North Carolina and has been working there for the last 4 years. Because of the small size of his apartment, he stored some of his furniture in Georgia with his parents. Paul got a job in Washington, DC. It cost him $300 to move his furniture from North Carolina to Washington and $1,100 to move his furniture from Georgia to Washington. If Paul shipped his furniture in Georgia from North Carolina (his former home), it would have cost $600. He can deduct only $600 of the $1,100 he paid. He can deduct $900 ($300 + $600).

Note: You cannot deduct the cost of moving furniture you buy on the way to your new home.

Travel expenses. You can deduct the cost of transportation and lodging for yourself and members of your household while traveling from your former home to your new home. This includes expenses for the day you arrive. You can include any lodging expenses you had in the area of your former home within one day after you could not live in your former home because your furniture had been moved. You can deduct expenses for only one trip to your new home for yourself and members of your household. However, all of you do not have to travel together. If you use your own car, calculate your deduction as explained under Travel By Car, earlier.

Moves Outside the United States

To deduct allowable expenses for a move outside the United States, you must be a United States citizen or resident alien who moves to the area of a new place of work outside the United States or its possessions. You must meet the requirements of the tax law for deducting moving expenses.

In addition to the expenses discussed earlier, the following may be deductible for moves outside the United States.

Storage expenses. You can deduct the reasonable expenses of moving your personal effects to and from storage. You can also deduct the reasonable expenses of storing your personal effects for all or part of the time the new job location remains your main job location. The new job location must be outside the United States.

Moving expenses allocable to excluded foreign income. If you live and work outside the United States, you may be able to exclude from income part of the income you earn in the foreign country. You may also be able to claim a foreign housing exclusion or deduction. If you claim the foreign earned income or foreign housing exclusions, you cannot deduct the part of your allowable moving expenses that relates to the excluded income.



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